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20121006
20121014
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
, for example, or a secretly taped fundraising talk. >> here is romney, that secret video taping of the 47%. >> reporter: we found one such bettor, mit sloan school student andre gloria. >> the question that you're really answering when you're placing a bet is: who do you think will win? not who will you vote for? >> reporter: gloria is constantly checking betting markets the world over. >> ill have a nice christmas break, thanks to this, yeah. >> reporter: and though this mba student doesn't play in low- stakes iowa, he's very much like her speculators, says joyce berg. our market traders are very different than the general voting population. they're predominantly male, they're wealthier than the average voter, younger than the average voter, better educated than the average voter. >> reporter: and as we take one last look at the iowa market, the quietest bookie in america, one last question-- how accurate have the polls proved to be? >> so we've gone back over time since the '88 election, looked at over 900 polls and compared the iem prediction to the poll prediction and found that in 75
so gladly >> generally, people who are interested in talking about politics love to engage, so they talk to us quite a bit. >> reporter: but since every pollster claims to come up with a scientific random sample eventually, how can the results be romney up by four and obama down by three at the very same time? newly minted phd economist david rothschild works at microsoft research in manhattan. rothschild looks at economic models, state polls and markets. his currently gives obama a 65% chance to win. >> i never sweat too much about any individual poll because there's too much noise. >> reporter: too much noise meaning... >> too much movement. >> reporter: take the so-called bumps - after a vice- presidential pick, or a convention. or take the first presidential debate. say you're a democrat, the morning after. a pollster calls you, you dont want anything to do with it, you're upset, you hang up that phone. they call another guy, the exact same demographics as you because they're trying to fill some sort of demographic hole or whatnot, he's a republican, hes stoked. the same pe
with. >> kennedy, the veteran, ignored romney's charge >> mr. romney, let's put the ads aside and talk about health care. let's talk about education. let's talk about training. let's talk about new jobs. let's talk about infrastructure. let's talk about our different vision for massachusetts. that's what the people of massachusetts want to talk about. that's what ihink they ought to hear about. >> i think about ten or 15 minutes in, romney began to realize this was not the easy exercise he thought it was going to be. >> reporter: then romney faulterred. the issue was health care. >> i have a plan. i have a position paper on health care. i'm happy to show it to you, senator any lime you would like. >> mr. romney, it isn't a question of showing me your paper. it's a question of showing all of the people in here that are watching this program the paper. they ought to have an opportunity to know. what is the cost of your program? >> i don't have a cost of my program >> you don't have a cost i'm sorry. i don't have... >> what will be the impact of that on the budget >> i to not know the spe
to remember that democrats were talking about paul ryan and paul ryan's budget months before governor romney even chose him to be his running mate, this was already an issue, it was already in ads, and something that was already part of the conversation at the congressional level, before paul ryan was named the v.p. running mate. >> reporter: here outside buffalo, ny, congresswoman kathy hochul is perhaps the clearest example of democrats' national strategy. hochul won a special election in 2011 in a republican district, running against the ryan plan and its changes to medicare. national strategists thought they had a winning issue. in the meantime, hochul's district, the 27th, was redrawn to lean even more republican. hochul is still on the offense when it comes to the ryan budget. but she's facing criticism from republicans for her support of president obama's health care reform law. >> when times are tough, you decide where you've got to cut. but i am telling you, we don't do it on the backs of our seniors. this is not an entitlement program, like a lot of people in washington call it. it
for barack obama; kristin for mitt romney. when i'm not here, do you guys ever talk about this stuff? >> usually heatedly and in the car. >> we both have our positions. >> we both have our positions. well we both agree on gay rights and the availability of abortion. but she thinks the government should take more of your money and spread it around and i think the government should keep the hell off my money. >> ifill: we met the stewarts at the annual apple cider festival in the denver suburb of lakewood-- much valued voters both candidates need to win battleground colorado. the president deserves another chance, said 30-year-old glenna. >> i believe he was dealt a difficult hand and in spite of a lot of the negative things that happened, i believe he's doing the very best that he can. and i believe he can continue to do good things for this country. >> ifill: but you like romney? >> well... i like the republican point of view, shall we say. i like less government. i like less governmental interference in our lives. >> ifill: colorado was once a reliably republican state. no more. the
struggling long before the crisis hit. but today's news certainly is not an excuse to try to talk down the economy to score a few political points. it's a reminder that this country has come too far to turn back now. >> brown: that was a swipe at republican mitt romney and his economic prescriptions. but in southwest virginia, romney fired back that the report does not portray a real recovery. >> the unemployment rate, as you noted, this year has come down very, very slowly. but it's come down, nonetheless. the reason it's come down this year is primarily due to the fact that more and more people have just stopped looking for work. so it looks like unemployment's getting better, but the truth is, if the same share of people were participating in the workforce today as on the day the president got elected, why, our unemployment rate would be around 11%. that's the real reality of what's happening out there. >> brown: in fact, total employment in september did increase, for the first time since june, by 873,000. but two-thirds of those were people who took part-time jobs when they could
me ask you about another part of the world, peter feaver. that is china. we heard governor romney say... he cited again and again the need for the united states to take the lead around the world. he said the u.s. should use its great influence to shape events. then he talked about china's recent assertiveness in the pacific region. what would he have the united states do right now to shape events with china? >> well, there has been some bipartisanship on east asia. so the obama administration after flirting with a different policy in 2009 returned to an emphasis on asia that had been there in the previous administration. there was an emphasis that involved strengthening our alliances with japan and india and presenting to china a clear choice about we will cooperate if they play by the rules of the game, but we will also demand that they play by the rules of the game. that strategy, which obama came to rather late, has been the strategy that followed in the past. that's the strategy that we will follow in the future. the problem with president obama'sivot to asia is not that he's foc
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)